“Light Mine” in the running for another accolade

27 Jul 2021

Already having won HOME magazine’s Home of the Year award and a New Zealand Institute of Architects award for the Waikato/Bay of Plenty, the “Light Mine” beach house at Kuaotunu (pictured) is in the running for another accolade.

The home is one of four New Zealand entries shortlisted in the House and Villa (Rural/Nature) Completed Buildings category of the World Architecture Festival, the most prestigious international architecture awards.

Light Mine was designed by architect, Ken Crosson, and built by Percival Construction of Whitianga. The house’s strong sculptural forms were inspired by the history of Kuaotunu and, in particular, an old drawing of some of the many mine shafts that dominated the landscape in the gold-mining boom of the 1800s. The three turret structures have windows at the top allowing light to flood the rooms below. “Here, the shafts are inverted, mining the sunshine and starlight, extending into the sky as opposed to the earth,” Ken says.

For Damian Percival of Percival Construction, the eye-catching turrets represented one of the more complex aspects of the build. “The light shafts were totally unique - to construct them provided some challenges as each shaft was different in size and shape with none of the sides equal to the other,” he says. “They raised some discussion during the build from locals, visitors and those involved in the construction process.”

The rustic exterior, which contrasts strongly with the modern clean lines inside, was achieved through the use of reclaimed totara from a swamp which Ken says will weather over time to complement the sand and beach vegetation. 

Ken has another home shortlisted in the House and Villa (Rural/Nature) Completed Buildings category, the “Shapeshifter” house at Omaha Beach. 
Pictured: The “Light Mine” beach house at Kuaotunu is in the running for another accolade.