Saturday, 17 November 2018

WHITIANGA WEATHER

The importance of Social Services in Zoe Cutfield’s life

Local artist, Zoe Cutfield will be turning 90 this year. For the past 40 years she’s called Whitianga home. Most of her time in Mercury Bay she’s been busy - getting her shop, Zoe’s Gallery (now Mosaic Gallery) off the ground, painting and creating and being a mother and wife.

In 2007 Zoe suffered from bad health and with no family members residing locally, Yvette Simpson, Whitianga Social Services’ support worker for the elderly, entered the picture. This story is an example of the tremendous work Yvette does with many of the older people in our community.

One of Zoe’s friends alerted Social Services that she wasn’t in a good state. Yvette paid Zoe a visit and found a lady in desperate need of a knee operation, but stuck on the hospital waiting list. Yvette immediately arranged for Zoe, who’s also a diabetic, to access a disability allowance and other entitlements and advocated for her to move up the waiting list. It worked and soon Zoe underwent the first of four successful knee operations. Yvette stayed in touch with Zoe after the operations, ensuring she was able to stay well at home.

In 2009, two years after Yvette first became involved in Zoe’s life, Zoe’s knee was playing up again and Yvette arranged some physiotherapy. That was followed with a really bad episode of shingles behind the eyes, forcing Zoe to spend time in Whitianga Continuing Care. After six weeks in Continuing Care, Zoe was ready to go home and Yvette made sure she had all the support she needed to be safe and well-looked after.

In 2011 Zoe had a bad fall. Yvette arranged for an occupational therapist to assist Zoe through her recovery. It was also a lonely time for Zoe and Yvette asked the Mercury Bay Lionesses what they could do to help. As a result, a local Lioness started to visit Zoe every Monday afternoon. These visits are still continuing, the Lioness and Zoe using the time to paint together.

In 2012 Zoe suffered an episode related to her diabetes. Yvette initially responded by regularly checking that Zoe would take her insulin. She later involved a specialist diabetic nurse and introduced Zoe to the Mercury Bay Health Support Group.

Last year Yvette arranged through the formal DHB funded Needs Assessment Service a home help person to visit Zoe every morning and afternoon to assist her with her medication and personal care needs.

And in between, Yvette was, and still is, happy to arrange grocery shopping for Zoe, to arrange for the plumber or electrician to come out to Zoe’s place when needed, to take Zoe to the dentist, doctor and optometrists and to help Zoe look after Jimmy, her cat.

In Zoe’s words, "I very, very much like having Yvette around."

Zoe is one of many older members of our community Yvette looks after. "I know I make a difference to these people’s lives," said Yvette. "Seeing Zoe at nearly 90-years-old still challenging herself to create fabulously unique art pieces is so inspiring, it makes my heart sing."

Older people needing support, advice or information, or those concerned about an older person, are welcome to contact Whitianga Social Services at
2 Cook Drive or telephone 866 4476.

Weve lost another metre

Another storm and we’ve lost another metre of the foreshore at Whitianga’s Buffalo Beach. The new rock wall is doing its job - at least the toilets are still there. The dunes planted with indigenous vegetation towards Mother Brown’s Creek are also doing their job. No erosion there. But the area between the wall and the dunes is a problem - and a big one at that. Another storm or two and the Buffalo Memorial (just past the new rock wall) may be in real danger. The pohutukawa in front of the memorial is already, some say, past the point of being saved.

So, on Wednesday last week, as soon as I became aware of the damage last week’s storm caused to Buffalo Beach, I wrote to Waikato Regional Council, Thames Coromandel District Council, the Coastal Erosion Steering Group, central government and concerned residents to find out what can be done and, more importantly, when.

Here’s a summary of what I’ve been told.

Concerned resident, Jo Fearn is of the view the new rock wall caused erosion at the Buffalo Memorial and north of that to accelerate. She ideally would like to see the entire beach protected with a dune planting programme, but accepts drastic action, in the form of an extension to the wall, is necessary.

Coastal Erosion Steering Group member, John Evans would like to see work on an extension to the wall to start tomorrow. Thinking further ahead,
he would like to see a test groyne being installed to see if that will assist with rebuilding of the beach over the longer term.

Waikato Regional Councillor for the Coromandel, Clyde Graf is of the view some money WRC committed to find a long term solution should be directed into physical work.

Coromandel Member of Parliament, Scott Simpson said one thing is certain - any solution will be ugly and expensive.

That’s a feeling shared by TCDC. The new rock wall was very expensive and there isn’t funding available for an extension. They appreciate the urgency of the matter, however, and a late item will be tabled at the upcoming Council meeting on 25 June to discuss possible funding for a 150m extension to the wall and fast-tracking of the work. If funding is approved and there aren’t any hold-ups in the resource consent process, work on an extension, which will take two to three months to complete, can start this year still.

TCDC has also scheduled for August/September this year another dune planting of about 150m south towards the Buffalo Memorial.

Distilling all the replies I received, I think it’s possible that by the end of this year or early next year another 300m of Buffalo Beach will be protected - rock 150m northwards, dune planting 150m southwards. Which still leaves a bit in the middle.

So, I wonder - why can’t the dune planting programme be extended, all the way south to where the extension to the rock wall will end? I don’t know much about coastal science - if things like wave-impact will allow more dunes to be planted, but I think it’s a question worth asking. As I think it will be worth going to Thames on 25 June - to hear if the new rock wall will, in fact, be extended.

Whitianga dog attack owner comes forward

The owner of the dog that bit a man at the Whitianga skateboard park has come forward and is fully cooperating with Thames Coromandel District Council’s compliance officers.

The victim was visiting the Whitianga skate park with his partner and two small children on Saturday 14 June when he was bitten on the leg by a large tan dog and required medical attention for the bite

TCDC released information about the attack yesterday requesting information. The owner heard the report on Newstalk ZB, then read it on social media and came forward immediately.

The owner lives in Whitianga, has admitted the attack occurred and has accepted responsibility for what happened. The dog was registered and is a dark tan, Neapolitan mastiff cross.

New Countdown in Whitianga opened this morning

Countdown opened its 170th store in New Zealand in Whitianga this morning.

At a short opening ceremony Karl Wareham, Countdown’s manager for the Waikato and Coromandel areas, said the store is a tribute to the hard work of a large team of people and he is delighted with the way it turned out.

Store manager, Kim Bradley said Countdown has already made a contribution to the Mercury Bay X-ray machine campaign and she’s looking forward to a deeper involvement in the local community. She has also used the opportunity to hand a trolley of food to Kay Worth from the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army is a key partner in Countdown’s programme of free food distribution – annually in excess of $1.4 million.

Thames Coromandel District Council mayor, Glenn Leach, who cut the ribbon and unveiled the plaque, was delighted with New Zealand’s largest private employer of people now having a presence on the Coromandel.

Countdown employs more than 18,000 team members throughout New Zealand. The Whitianga store created 55 jobs, 90 per cent of whom are from the Whitianga area.

The Whitianga store has been designed with Countdown’s latest new-generation format and features wider aisles, an expansive fresh produce department and energy efficient fittings and equipment. The store also features a full-service bakery baking fresh goods daily, more than 175 car parks and 13 checkouts, including six assisted checkouts, three express checkouts, and six self-serve checkouts.

New Countdown in Whitianga opened this morning

Countdown opened its 170th store in New Zealand in Whitianga this morning.

At a short opening ceremony Karl Wareham, Countdown’s manager for the Waikato and Coromandel areas, said the store is a tribute to the hard work of a large team of people and he is delighted with the way it turned out.

Store manager, Kim Bradley said Countdown has already made a contribution to the Mercury Bay X-ray machine campaign and she’s looking forward to a deeper involvement in the local community. She has also used the opportunity to hand a trolley of food to Kay Worth from the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army is a key partner in Countdown’s programme of free food distribution – annually in excess of $1.4 million.

Thames Coromandel District Council mayor, Glenn Leach, who cut the ribbon and unveiled the plaque, was delighted with New Zealand’s largest private employer of people now having a presence on the Coromandel.

Countdown employs more than 18,000 team members throughout New Zealand. The Whitianga store created 55 jobs, 90 per cent of whom are from the Whitianga area.

The Whitianga store has been designed with Countdown’s latest new-generation format and features wider aisles, an expansive fresh produce department and energy efficient fittings and equipment. The store also features a full-service bakery baking fresh goods daily, more than 175 car parks and 13 checkouts, including six assisted checkouts, three express checkouts, and six self-serve checkouts.

TCDC looking for owner of dog that attacked man in Whitianga

Thames Coromandel District Council would like to talk to the owner of a dog that attacked a man at the Whitianga skateboard park at lunchtime on Saturday 14 June.

The man was visiting the Whitianga skateboard park with his partner and two small children on when he was bitten on the leg by a large tan dog.

The dog was with a European male in his twenties who admitted to the victim that the dog bites and then left the skateboard park before giving any details. He is thought to be a local resident who frequents the park.

The victim required medical attention for the bite.

TCDC's Compliance Officers wish to speak to the owner of the dog about the incident as it is of concern that this dog was at the skateboard park within reach of children and the owner was aware that the dog has been known to have aggressive behaviour.

If you have information that can help, please call 07 868 0200 and ask for one of the TCDC Compliance team members.

Information will be received in confidence.

Surprise visitor to Mercury Bay after storm

When Kevin Robinson from Whitianga woke up the morning after the storm last week, he found a grey-headed albatross in his back yard. Concerned that the bird was injured, he captured it and took it to Annemieke Kregting in Kuaotunu. Annemieke is known as Mercury Bay’s saviour of injured and stray birds.

Annemieke noticed that the albatross was tagged and got hold of the Department of Conservartion. Their inquiries revealed that the bird was tagged in Australia.

Upon further investigation it has now come to light that the bird was tagged as a chick on Macquarie Island, between New Zealand and Antarctica, on 1 March this year. “It’s pretty awesome that a bird which is likely less than six months old is already more than 2,500km away from where it was hatched,” said Annemieke.

The bird was fortunately not injured and was last week Thursday released at Matarangi.

Adult grey-headed albatrosses averages 81cm in length and a 2.2m wingspan.  

Surprise visitor to Mercury Bay after storm

When Kevin Robinson from Whitianga woke up the morning after the storm last week, he found a grey-headed albatross in his back yard. Concerned that the bird was injured, he captured it and took it to Annemieke Kregting in Kuaotunu. Annemieke is known as Mercury Bay’s saviour of injured and stray birds.

Annemieke noticed that the albatross was tagged and got hold of the Department of Conservartion. Their inquiries revealed that the bird was tagged in Australia.

Upon further investigation it has now come to light that the bird was tagged as a chick on Macquarie Island, between New Zealand and Antarctica, on 1 March this year. “It’s pretty awesome that a bird which is likely less than six months old is already more than 2,500km away from where it was hatched,” said Annemieke.

The bird was fortunately not injured and was last week Thursday released at Matarangi.

Adult grey-headed albatrosses averages 81cm in length and a 2.2m wingspan.  

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