Wednesday, 26 September 2018

WHITIANGA WEATHER

Ranfurly Shield to visit Whitianga

The Thames Valley Rugby Union’s Swamp Foxes will be challenging for the Ranfurly Shield against Counties Manukau on 2 July. To promote the game, the shield will be touring the Coromandel and Hauraki Plains next week.

The shield will be at Mercury Bay Area School on Tuesday 17 June from 12:30pm - 2:00pm. Everyone is welcome to have a look at the shield, just sign in at the school office.

The shield, colloquially known as the “Log o' Wood,” was first played for in 1904. The shield is based on a challenge system - the holding union must defend the shield in challenge matches and a successful challenger becomes its new holder.

Counties Manukau won the shield on after beating Hawkes Bay on 7 September 2013.

Whitianga in numbers

Statistics New Zealand has recently released more information gathered in the 2013 Census that makes it possible to profile New Zealand’s towns and cities. It’s interesting to look at Whitianga and its place in the Thames Coromandel District (the TCD).

4,368 people usually live in Whitianga. This is an increase of 15.9 per cent since the 2006 Census and represents 16.7 per cent of the TCD’s population. There are 171 more females than males in town. The median age (half are younger and half are older than this age) of Whitianga residents is 48 years six months. In the TCD the median age is just more than 51 years. 22.7 per cent of people in Whitianga are older than 65, compared with 27 per cent in the TCD. 18 per cent of residents are under 15 years old. In the TCD the percentage is 16.3.

There are 1,986 occupied dwellings (61.4 per cent of all dwellings) in Whitianga and 1,248 unoccupied dwellings. In the TCD just more than 50 per cent of dwellings are occupied.

The most common ethnic group in Whitianga is European (89.1 per cent) with 14.4 per cent Maori and the balance from a wide range of other cultures. In the TCD Europeans make up 88.5 per cent of the population and Maori 16.6 per cent. 17.3 per cent of the people living in Whitianga were born overseas with the most common birthplace being the UK and Ireland. Just more than ten per cent of the population can speak more than one language, including 2.5 per cent who can speak Te Reo Maori. In the TCD the percentage of Te Reo speakers is 3.7.

Whitianga is a well-educated community - 73.9% per cent of people aged 15 years and over have a secondary school and/or post-school qualification. That is slightly higher than the 72.3 per cent of people in the TCD. 9.6 per cent of Whitianga residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher qualification.

In Whitianga 6.3 per cent of people older than 15 years are unemployed. That is 0.5 per cent higher than the unemployment rate in the TCD. The most common occupation in Whitianga is manager, followed by labourer, professional, tradesperson and salesperson.

The median annual income (half earn more and half earn less than this amount) per person in Whitianga is low - just $23,100. 42.3 percent of people aged 15 years and over have an annual income of $20,000 or less, compared with 43 percent of people in the TCD as a whole. In Whitianga, 15.3 percent of people aged 15 years and over have an annual income of more than $50,000. In the TCD, the percentage is 17.2. According to the June 2013 New Zealand Income Survey (compiled by Statistics New Zealand),
the median weekly income of all people in New Zealand aged 15 and older is $844 per week, or $43,888 per year.

There are 679 businesses in Whitianga, representing 16.8 percent of all businesses in the TCD. These businesses employ 1,670 staff, an increase of 5 per cent from the 2006 Census. In the TCD there are 9,080 paid employees.

There are certainly a lot of numbers here, but they do make interesting reading and can help all of us to better understand and appreciate the community we live in.

We will in a future issue have a look at what the numbers are saying about Tairua-Pauanui.

Power outings and roads closed after wild night

Power outings and roads closed all around wider Mercury Bay after a night of heavy winds and lots of rain.

Trees are down and Coroglen, Cooks Beach, Ferry Landing, Hahei, Kaimarama, Kuaotuno, Matarangi, Opito Bay, Rings Beach, Te Rerenga, Whangapoua, Whenuakite and Whitianga are all without power.

PowerCo hopes all power will be restored by 5:00pm today.

State Highway 25 is closed between Whitianga and Tairua and also at Hikuai. It’s uncertain when the road will open again.

A big tree that was bolwn over is also blocking the Tapu-Coroglen Road.

Normality returning to Mercury Bay

Normality is returning to Mercury Bay. Power is restored in most areas, cell phone service is up and running again and the roads are all open.

But there will be a cost. Some properties suffered significant damage - roofs blew off houses and shops (with at least one shop in Whitianga suffering major water damage), big trees were uprooted (landing in at least one instance on a boat) and more worrying beach ersosion occurred. At least no-one suffered significant injuries.

Let's not forget our emergency services, mostly volunteers, who were up most of the night to ensure our safety.

The photos sent in by our readers tell the story of a day most of us will remember for some time to come.

Normality returning to Mercury Bay

Normality is returning to Mercury Bay. Power is restored in most areas, cell phone service is up and running again and the roads are all open.

But there will be a cost. Some properties suffered significant damage - roofs blew off houses and shops (with at least one shop in Whitianga suffering major water damage), big trees were uprooted (landing in at least one instance on a boat) and more worrying beach ersosion occurred. At least no-one suffered significant injuries.

Let's not forget our emergency services, mostly volunteers, who were up most of the night to ensure our safety.

The photos sent in by our readers tell the story of a day most of us will remember for some time to come.

Normality returning to Mercury Bay

Normality is returning to Mercury Bay. Power is restored in most areas, cell phone service is up and running again and the roads are all open.

But there will be a cost. Some properties suffered significant damage - roofs blew off houses and shops (with at least one shop in Whitianga suffering major water damage), big trees were uprooted (landing in at least one instance on a boat) and more worrying beach ersosion occurred. At least no-one suffered significant injuries.

Let's not forget our emergency services, mostly volunteers, who were up most of the night to ensure our safety.

The photos sent in by our readers tell the story of a day most of us will remember for some time to come.

Normality returning to Mercury Bay

Normality is returning to Mercury Bay. Power is restored in most areas, cell phone service is up and running again and the roads are all open.

But there will be a cost. Some properties suffered significant damage - roofs blew off houses and shops (with at least one shop in Whitianga suffering major water damage), big trees were uprooted (landing in at least one instance on a boat) and more worrying beach ersosion occurred. At least no-one suffered significant injuries.

Let's not forget our emergency services, mostly volunteers, who were up most of the night to ensure our safety.

The photos sent in by our readers tell the story of a day most of us will remember for some time to come.

Update on the conditions in Mercury Bay

Power is still out in the entire Mercury Bay area, from Whangapoua to Whenuakite and also in Cooks Beach, Hahei and Hot Water Beach. Power is expected to be restored by 5:00pm today.

State Highway 25 between Whitianga and Tairua and the Tapu-Coroglen road are both now open. State Highway 25 is still closed at Hikuai.

Both the Telecom and Vodafone mobile phone networks are still out, but repairs are underway.

The storm last night caused widespread damage across Mercury Bay. Some properties lost their roofs, trees were uprooted and Buffalo Beach and Brophy’s Beach in Whitianga suffered significant erosion damage.

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